Life
Teen crashes her own car to save a woman's life
She looked over at the woman and knew something wasn't right.
Rozzette Cabrera
05.19.21

For a lot of people, teen drivers can be considered the most dangerous on the road. Because they are inexperienced, they aren’t equipped to make the decisions that people need to stay safe on the road. They are less likely to wear seat belts. Plus, they tend to get distracted easily when they’re behind the wheel of a car.

One teenager from Florida showed the world that teens could be great drivers.

YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay
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YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay

Olivia Jones, a student from Clearwater High School, saved a woman’s life while on the road. It happened just two days before Christmas.

Olivia intentionally caused an accident.

YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay
Source:
YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay

And it’s different from what you’re probably thinking. She wasn’t drunk and she wasn’t using her phone when it happened.

While she was driving, Olivia saw something strange in the car next to her.

YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay
Source:
YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay

She was stopped at a red light so she got to see what was happening to its driver. At first, she thought everything was normal. However, when she took a second look, that’s when she realized that a medical emergency was happening.

In an interview with WTSP, she shared:

“I thought she was texting because she was looking straight down. And then she started seizing.”

Soon after, the woman’s car started sliding into oncoming traffic.

Pexels-Stan
Source:
Pexels-Stan

At that point, Olivia started alerting the drivers behind her. Unfortunately, they didn’t understand what she was trying to say.

Olivia didn’t think twice about saving the woman’s life.

YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay
Source:
YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay

The only way she could save her was to cause an intentional accident. It wasn’t an easy decision but she did it anyway. She didn’t even think about what could happen to her and her car.

YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay
Source:
YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay

She shared:

“She was kind of like seizing out of the car. I took her seat belt off. She had blood and had peed herself. I was on the phone with 911.”

Two minutes later, authorities arrived.

Although the response of the authorities was quick, two minutes still probably felt like a lifetime to Olivia. It was a terrifying experience, particularly for a teen.

YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay
Source:
YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay

Olivia admitted that she was scared. She said:

“Oh, yeah. My legs were shaking. I didn’t know… I just… I don’t know. I was really nervous.”

Olivia’s bravery was praised by a lot of people.

One of the people who were able to watch her interview said:

“Man, this young lady is such a quick thinker and a kind person. I love that there are good people in the world and we’re still trying to put light on them.”

Another one said:

“A teenager?!?? Wowwww. I would’ve definitely hesitated and been unsure what to do. Most kids would’ve been too afraid to damage their car. This girl is well beyond her years her parents should be soooooooo proud.”

Not all people think what Olivia did was great.

Her friends actually thought that what she did was dumb. It’s a good thing that a lot of people don’t agree with them.

One YouTube user said:

“This young woman is far from dumb. Her parents should be so very proud of the fine young lady they raised. She showed some of the finest traits that humanity has and everyone should strive to be as thoughtful and caring as this young girl.”

Olivia’s car was damaged.

YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay
Source:
YouTube Screenshot-10 Tampa Bay

And she’s not super sad about it. Life is more important than the dents on her car.

Watch Olivia’s inspiring story in the video below!

Please SHARE this with your friends and family.

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By Rozzette Cabrera
hi@sbly.com
Rozzette Cabrera is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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