Life
Seniors and young adults are now renting together and seeing benefits in many ways
The young adults do everything from cooking meals to teaching them how to use computers.
Luis Gaskell
08.04.22

In case you haven’t noticed, it’s become pretty darn expensive to live these days.

Inflation has increased to uncomfortable amounts, and wages haven’t exactly kept up.

And in response, a lot of young people are finding more workarounds to this problem. Sometimes, it’s splitting the rent between lots of people.

One new workaround to the higher cost of living is the intergenerational roommate arrangement. But what is that?

Pexels - George Becker
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Pexels - George Becker

This new trend, if you could call it that, sees young people living with seniors that they aren’t related to.

Pexels - Andrea Piacquadio
Source:
Pexels - Andrea Piacquadio

Many senior citizens long for some youthful company, and it doesn’t always have to be their grandkids or caretakers.

Hence the birth of intergenerational living.

As an example of intergenerational living, take a look at 25-year-old Nadia Abdullah.

Pixabay - TheDigitalArtist
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Pixabay - TheDigitalArtist

The college graduate had trouble securing an affordable apartment for post-college life. Even college degrees don’t guarantee you’ll be able to financially support yourself these days.

It’s that sad reality that led to people like her turning to solutions like this.

After no luck with her search for one in Boston, she turned to home-sharing agency Nesterly.

Through this agency, young people looking for living space get matched with older homeowners who have space to offer.

This was how she met 64-year-old Judith Allonby, an attorney who now shares her living space with Nadia.

Nadia is very happy with the arrangement, as is Judith. In fact, Nadia says she’s just like family now.

The United States isn’t the only country where intergenerational roommates are becoming a thing.

In parts of Europe, people have begun to experiment with intergenerational living arrangements too. Though here, the rent isn’t paid with money. It’s paid with work instead.

Jurrien, a 20-year-old student from the Netherlands, spends time at a retirement home with seniors as old as their 90s.

The students aren’t charged rent. In exchange for the living space, they provide quality leisure time and company for the seniors.

After all, living in a retirement home can get awfully lonely.

Pexels - MART PRODUCTION
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Pexels - MART PRODUCTION

And for a young college student who might find it hard to juggle studies and working to pay the rent, it’s a pretty fantastic arrangement.

Jurrien and the others do everything from cooking meals to teaching them how to use computers – and even going for walks.

Sounds pretty nice for some achievable living space, I’ve got to say.

In both the US and Europe, student rooms and small apartments are hardly worth the renting costs.

Pexels - Andrea Piacquadio
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Pexels - Andrea Piacquadio

All too often, they are cramped and don’t have many quality of life features.

“Here I have twice as much space and I have my own kitchen and bathroom.” – Jurrien said

Living with a senior to get that family dynamic going, while also taking a load off of living expenses is mutually beneficial. It’s a wonder this hasn’t taken off yet.

Pexels - Andrea Piacquadio
Source:
Pexels - Andrea Piacquadio

Sounds like it could be perfect for some people.

What do you think? Could the future show us more young people turning to intergenerational living?

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By Luis Gaskell
hi@sbly.com
Luis Gaskell is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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