Life
Teens Camping Trip Takes Frightening Turn When Boyfriend Is Struck By Lightning
It started as a fun camping trip - but in an instant, Juliette was scrambling to try and save her boyfriend's life.
Mary Rose Garra
09.20.21

Have you ever seen or been struck by lightning?

According to National Geographic:

“lightning is an electrical discharge caused by imbalances between storm clouds and the ground, or within the clouds themselves.”

The majority of lightning strikes within clouds.

Pexels - Tanya Gorelova
Source:
Pexels - Tanya Gorelova

In this story, you’ll see how a teen saved her boyfriend’s life after a lightning strike.

Isaiah Cormier, 18, and his girlfriend Juliette Moore of more than two years were camping together near Nederland, Colorado. They had no idea that what was supposed to be a fun trip would turn out to be disastrous.

Unsplash - Tommy Lisbin
Source:
Unsplash - Tommy Lisbin

One Saturday in July 2018, Isaiah was struck by lightning while the teens were enjoying their weekend in the Ruby Gulch Area.

“I had just gone inside the tent and seen a really bright flash of light,” Juliette told CBS Denver.

“He wasn’t responding so I rolled him over. It was very clear that something was wrong.”

Pexels - Dave Morgan
Source:
Pexels - Dave Morgan

Juliette dialed 911 and immediately began performing CPR on her boyfriend.

Thankfully, she had taken a CPR class just one month earlier as part of her certification as a coach.

“I only had to do one round, and he came back and started gasping,” Juliette recalled to Denver 7.

“And he stopped breathing again, so I gave him a second round of CPR after that he was breathing and doing alright.”

YouTube Screenshot - CBS Denver
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - CBS Denver

Juliette’s quick thinking and action saved Isaiah’s life until emergency personnel arrived.

The teenager was taken to the University of Colorado Health Burn Center.

Dr. Anne Wagner, medical director of the UCHealth Burn Center, said,

“He wouldn’t have survived if she didn’t know CPR.”

YouTube Screenshot - CBS Denver
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - CBS Denver

She stated that she undergoes a treatment similar to Isaiah every year, but only two have survived in her entire career.

What are the dangers of lightning?

According to National Weather Service (NWS),

“Lightning is a major cause of storm related deaths in the U.S. A lightning strike can result in a cardiac arrest (heart stopping) at the time of the injury, although some victims may appear to have a delayed death a few days later if they are resuscitated but have suffered irreversible brain damage.”

YouTube Screenshot - CBS Denver
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - CBS Denver

NWS Storm Data recorded the United States has averaged 43 reported lightning fatalities per year over the last 30 years (1989-2018).

Isaiah recovered in the hospital and was released on Monday.

However, he was still in a lot of pain and has a mark on his neck from where the lightning struck.

He was fortunate that the lightning passed through his right foot and did not cause any damage to his internal organs.

YouTube Screenshot - CBS Denver
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - CBS Denver

Juliette mentioned that,

“His family started calling him Flash, everyone we talked to asked what his superpower was and when the next Marvel movie is coming out.”

A life-altering experience.

Isaiah was grateful that his girlfriend was there and knew how to perform CPR. The teenagers want everyone to know how important it is to learn CPR, following everything that has happened.

YouTube Screenshot - CBS Denver
Source:
YouTube Screenshot - CBS Denver

The U.S. NWS said that “by the time to see lightning or hear thunder, you are already in danger.”

On their official Facebook page, they shared some do’s and don’ts when it comes to lightning.

Do:

“Go inside when you hear thunder or see lightning,” “Find a sturdy house, building, car with a hard-top roof,” and, “Stay indoors for at least 30 minutes after you last hear thunder.”

Don’t:

“Retreat to dugouts, sheds, pavilions, picnic shelters or other small structures,” “Use or touch electronics, outlets, or corded phones,” and, “Go under or near tall trees, swim or be near water, be near metal objects or windows.”

Watch the video below to hear their story!

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By Mary Rose Garra
hi@sbly.com
Mary Rose Garra is a contributor at SBLY Media.
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